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tv   [untitled]    November 7, 2011 12:30pm-1:00pm PST

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>> >> good afternoon. thank you, everyone, for coming to san francisco fire department headquarters. we're hear to honor vincent
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perez and fire department paramedic anthony valario. today we will be unveiling vince and tony's name on our line-of-duty death memorial wall. it is a somber ceremony and yet an important one and i think all of us, it's testament to the men that tony and vince were that vuso many people coming out once again to support one another and first and foremost, to support the valario and the perez family. this is a very special day because it is another illustration of just how special vince and tony were to all of us and how they will live on in our hearts and our minds and also in san francisco fire department's history because they gave their lives in their duties. thank you so much for everyone that's in attendance. we have uniformed members of this department. we have many of the civilian members of this department. all of us hear your pain and
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grieve with you and continue to grieve with you and you have my commitment that we will continue to be here with you as a family. not as replacements for tony and vince, but as supporters. and those of you that will continue to always contact you and reach out to you and i want you to know that you have a family in all of the members of the san francisco fire department. today we're joined by several people. i'd like to acknowledge a couple of people that were instrumental and helped us all out on june 2 and 3rd and 4th, the members of san francisco general hospital. dr. andre campbell and leslie dubbin who were very helpful and were hoping for a different outcome than what we experienced. we also have our police chief with us. thank you for being here. members of the command staff. you'll hear from the mayor soon. i'd like to start off this, a simple but symbolic ceremony and
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i'd like to ask our department chaplain, father john green, to begin with an invocation. father green? >> before the invocation today, i would like to ask you to join with me in acknowledging the valarios and perezs and the great sacrifice they made for us. [applause] if anything, our grief is more real now than it was a few months ago, and so it's all the more important that we remember each other and we pray for each other as we continue to struggle with the death of not only two fighters, but two friends, two sons. in the book of job, we hear, "oh, that my words were written down, would that they were inscribed in a record that, with an iron chisel and with lead
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they were cut in rock forever, but i know that my redeemer lives and i will see him on the last day." today, we acknowledge tony and vinnie by placing their names on this rock with the honorable names of all those who have gone before them and have given their lives for the people of san francisco. may god bless all those whose names are on this memorial tablet and may he especially bless our two new heroes as we inscribe their names today. amen. >> thank you, father green. i'd now like to ask mayor of san francisco, ed lee, to say a few comments and before i ask mayor lee to come up, i can't thank you enough on behalf of the san francisco fire department, i believe, on behalf of the perez and valario
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families for your outstanding and continued support of all of us during a really difficult time. mayor lee? mayor lee: thank you, chief. good afternoon, and to the perez family and the valario family, again, thank you very much, on behalf of our city and county of san francisco. i want to also acknowledge, of course, our commissioners from fire and chief of police and members of our general hospital and all the people that work together, people that i we recognize tony's sacrifice. this is a significant replacement here. this is our headquarters. people who come here from all walks of life to do the city's
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business but also to visit and find out how our fire department can connect with every city. this is a small token but this is a token deeply felt by our city and i want you to know that i share in your feelings that this is not just the individual firefighters, i also understand that this is a shared sacrifice with the families we are from. we want you to be here when we do this in part what the city's official family but also to let you know that i am grateful to you, the family members, and to the extent that i represent the people of this great city, we are grateful to you and each member, men and women of the fire department, as you do your
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jobs every day and we know that you put your lives on the line and there is a moment when you don't have a choice and there is no thought in what you have to do. remember that on september 11th this year. since june, i have had other occasions to work and be with the firefighters. we had a chance to be part of the chili cookoff, if you will, raising money. i had a chance to meet the new class of firefighters and welcome them in and so many other opportunities to let you know that the firefighters of this city, they do have rich lives. they have lives that are involved in every aspect. to know that the vincent and tony were part of that family
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and they were entering into all parts of people's lives and windy duty came, they were without hesitation. i want to express that you have a mayor that eternally grateful and the people of this city that are grateful to you? to all the officers and the management, especially a thank lemaire to the families of tony and vincent. -- and especially a thank-you to the families of tony and vincent. >> i would like to ask the president of the fire commission to make some comments on behalf of her and her colleagues. >> i want to save very briefly on behalf of the fire commission and behalf of all residents of san francisco how the family is grateful and appreciative for the service and dedication of vincent and
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anthony. speaking for the entire commission, this is a privilege and an honor to work with this department and to get to know you personally and professionally. i think people used words like honor and privilege a lot but seeing how this department came together around this tragedy, i think that this is an absolute honor for me and for the other commissioners as well. we are glad to be with you to take part in plain honor to tony and anthony. thank you very much and our hearts continue to be with you. think you. -- thank-you. >> before we continue, we will have a few presentations.
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i would like to ask the deputy chief of operations and the deputy chief to present flights to both families. they were given to us in june from the navy. both of them were flown on the uss arizona. a very generous person who is with us today personally had crafted the cases they are in. we really appreciate your support for us to make this presentation. thank you for being here.
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>> i would like to ask the president of local 798 -- 798 to offer up the presentation on behalf of local 798. >> many of us in this room consider ourselves lucky having known these colleagues. very few in this room were lucky enough to know them and sons, brother, and friend. we want you to know that their story is still being told, not only of their sacrifice and dedication, but of the men that they were, the friends that they had. we're still receiving cards from new york, ireland, london, with messages of condolence.
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we present you with two resolutions letting you know that the story of these sons and brothers are told. >> a memorial resolution by the great state of california to firefighter, paramedic, anthony bulgarvalario. self-described as the people's paramedic, he will be remembered for his enjoyment of spending time with family and friends, indulging and varied interests from chicken farmer to glider pilot being, as well as traveling. also, as a man who lived his life as an adventure, he was an avid surfer, scuba diver, and athlete and a bread maker.
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station 26 will be able to use his mother starter to continue making bread. whereas the people of california now pause to honor firefighter anthony valario who made the sacrifice in a line of duty. we celebrate his life and we honor his service. now be resolved by assembly members that upon the passing of a firefighter anthony valerio know that they can never repay the debt. by standing with all citizens in expressing the deepest appreciation for the selfless dedication to preserving public
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safety. resolution number 1275. >> the moral resolution by the grace tour of california, lieut. vincent perez, whereas known by family and friends by his boyhood nickname, the creature,
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he exemplified the true character of the brave men and women who give their time to the perilous duty of fire service. he'll be remembered for his sense of humor, his insatiable appetite, for his courage, unwavering devotion to the service of others. be resolved by assembly members that they upon the passing of the tenet of vincent perez know that they can never repay the debt owed by this firefighter -- owe it to this firefighter and his family. we express our deepest appreciation for his selfless dedication to preserving public safety. resolution 1276.
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>> thank you. i would like to ask any of you, a representative from each family to unveil their names on the memorial wall. they will always be etched in our minds and hearts. now, on the wall, for their heroism and selfless acts. their hearts are breaking. i know that yours are as well. this is important for honoring them. i want to show you the work that was done to add them to the wall.
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>> to the families, thank you for being with us to honor your son's, your brothers and they will always be part of the ridge sacrifice it -- fabric of the san francisco fire department. to all those gathered, i can say that this is most difficult part of my career, losing tony and vincent. i could not be more proud of how
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we have all pulled together, stepped out, and supported one another. three and a half months seem like just yesterday and sometimes it seems longer, but i think it is important to continue to support one another. it is ok to feel down about this one because it was a tragedy. we continue to offer our condolences to both families. i know that tony and vincent are looking down on us and encouraging us to move forward in our lives. thank you for being here. we are going to conclude with asking the captain of station 26. i would like to give particular acknowledgment to the members of station 26 to have felt this probably the most deeply. not only did you work with them but you became very close as friends.
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on behalf of the members of the department, i would like to ask the captain to come together -- to come forward and offer the tribute, which is something that we did at the memorial service at their funeral. i would like to ask anyone in uniform to prepared to hand salute. salute. [bell ringing] thank you everyone for coming.
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when a resident of san francisco is looking for health care, you look in your neighborhood first. what is closest to you? if you come to a neighborhood health center or a clinic, you then have access it a system of care in the community health network. we are a system of care that was probably based on the family practice model, but it was really clear that there are
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special populations with special needs. the cole street clinic is a youth clinic in the heart of the haight ashbury and they target youth. tom woodell takes care of many of the central city residents and they have great expertise in providing services for many of the homeless. potrero hill and southeast health centers are health centers in those particular communities that are family health centers, so they provide health care to patients across the age span. . >> many of our clients are working poor. they pay their taxes. they may run into a rough patch now and then and what we're able to provide is a bridge towards getting them back on their feet. the center averages about 14,000 visits a year in the health clinic alone. one of the areas that we
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specialize in is family medicine, but the additional focus of that is is to provide care to women and children. women find out they're pregnant, we talk to them about the importance of getting good prenatal care which takes many visits. we initially will see them for their full physical to determine their base line health, and then enroll them in prenatal care which occurs over the next 9 months. group prenatal care is designed to give women the opportunity to bond during their pregnancy with other women that have similar due dates. our doctors here are family doctors. they are able to help these women deliver their babies at the hospital, at general hospital. we also have the wic program, which is a program that provides food vouchers for our families after they have their children, up to age 5 they are able to receive food vouchers to get milk and cereal for
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their children. >> it's for the city, not only our clinic, but the city. we have all our children in san francisco should have insurance now because if they are low income enough, they get medical. if they actually have a little more assets, a little more income, they can get happy family. we do have family who come outside of our neighborhood to come on our clinic. one thing i learn from our clients, no matter how old they are, no matter how little english they know, they know how to get to chinatown, meaning they know how to get to our clinic. 85 percent of our staff is bilingual because we are serving many monolingual chinese patients.
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they can be child care providers so our clients can go out and work. >> we found more and more women of child bearing age come down with cancer and they have kids and the kids were having a horrible time and parents were having a horrible time. how do parents tell their kids they may not be here? what we do is provide a place and the material and support and then they figure out their own truth, what it means to them. i see the behavior change in front of my eyes. maybe they have never been able to go out of boundaries, their lives have been so rigid to sort of expressing that makes tremendous changes. because we did what we did, it is now sort of a nationwide model. >> i think you would be surprised if you come to these clinics. many of them i think would be your neighbors if you knew that. often times we just don't discuss that. we treat husband and wife and they bring in their kids or we treat the grandparents and then
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the next generation. there are people who come in who need treatment for their heart disease or for their diabetes or their high blood pressure or their cholesterol or their hepatitis b. we actually provide group medical visits and group education classes and meeting people who have similar chronic illnesses as you do really helps you understand that you are not alone in dealing with this. and it validates the experiences that you have and so you learn from each other. >> i think it's very important to try to be in tune with the needs of the community and a lot of our patients have -- a lot of our patients are actually immigrants who have a lot of competing priorities, family issues, child care issues, maybe not being able to find work or finding work and not being insured and health care sometimes isn't the top
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priority for them. we need to understand that so that we can help them take care of themselves physically and emotionally to deal with all these other things. they also have to be working through with people living longer and living with more chronic conditions i think we're going to see more patients coming through. >> starting next year, every day 10,000 people will hit the age of 60 until 2020. . >> the needs of the patients that we see at kerr senior center often have to do with the consequences of long standing substance abuse and mental illness, linked to their chronic diseases. heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, cancer, stroke, those kinds of chronic illnesses. when you get them in your 30's and 40's and you have them into
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your aging process, you are not going to have a comfortable old age. you are also seeing in terms of epidemics, an increase in alzheimer's and it is going to increase as the population increases. there are quite a few seniors who have mental health problems but they are also, the majority of seniors, who are hard-working, who had minimum wage jobs their whole lives, who paid social security. think about living on $889 a month in the city of san francisco needing to buy medication, one meal a day, hopefully, and health care. if we could provide health care early on we might prevent (inaudible) and people would be less likely to end up in the emergency room with a drastic outcome. we could actually provide
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prevention and health care to people who had no other way of getting health care, those without insurance, it might be more cost effectiti

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